Understanding Anxiety

Whether it’s starting a new job, taking care of family matters, or speaking in front of large groups, we all experience anxiety from time to time; and while this kind of anxiety generally does not affect one’s ability to get through their everyday lives, it can be quite debilitating for other individuals and put them at risk of developing further mental illness.

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Below is a look at some of the common disorders associated with anxiety:

Phobias
The strong, relentless and troublesome feeling of fear around any given situation, person, object or animal. People who suffer from phobias will go out of their way to avoid potential triggers, lessening their quality of life as a result. Similarly, those with agoraphobia also suffer from the same kinds of fears in addition to feeling as though they are trapped and unable to escape certain situations.

Panic Disorders
What would be considered a normal reaction to an otherwise stressful situation for those who don’t suffer from anxiety would be an extreme reaction for those who do – with symptoms such as the feeling of intense fear, constant worry, rapid heartbeat, sweaty palms, shortness of breath and nausea.

Generalized Anxiety
Those with generalized anxiety are oftentimes still able to function in social settings – however, they will excessively worry over what are considered to be mundane, everyday problems, have difficulty sleeping as well as muscle tension.

Social Anxiety Disorder
Unlike generalized anxiety, those who suffer from social anxiety disorder will avoid social situations whenever possible. They fear being judged by others. Social anxiety can have a severe impact on one’s performance in school or at work, as well as impinge on relationships.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Commonly referred to as OCD, obsessive-compulsive disorder is an assemblage of unwanted thoughts and urges, and abnormal and repeated actions in effort to diminish anxiety.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Also known as PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder is a result of a traumatic life event. Those with PTSD will experience extreme panic, have harrowing flashbacks, and will feel unsafe even when they are not in danger.

Regardless of age, education, income or cultural background, no one is exempt from anxiety or mental illness. At least 20% of Canadian adults will be diagnosed with a mental illness at some point in their lifetime, with 8% of those experiencing major depression. The stats are even more staggering when it comes to children: Up to 20% between the ages of 12 and 19 have already experienced anxiety or a major depressive episode, and as many as 4 million children are currently at risk of developing a mental illness in the future.

Regrettably, at least half of the individuals who say they suffer from mental illness will not see a physician; this is due in part to the stigma that surrounds mental illness and the fear of being discriminated against as a result. However, if left untreated, it can lead to serious and sometimes life-threatening problems, including other mental disorders, so it is important to recognize that with the right support, mental illness can be managed.

At Brentwood Medical Clinic in Burnaby, British Columbia, Dr. Ali Ghahary works in conjecture with patients, clinical psychologists and psychiatrists. While treatment varies from patient to patient, medication is oftentimes used to manage depression and anxiety. However, there are also some other commonly recommended suggestions that have been proven to be beneficial for those suffering from mental illness including CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) and physical activity.

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