Alzheimer’s Disease versus Age-Related Memory Loss

Dr. Ali Ghahary
Dr. Ali Ghahary

Dr. Ali Ghahary, a family physician in Burnaby, British Columbia, treats patients at all stages of life. Having previously served in a practice with a high percentage of elderly patients, Dr. Ali Ghahary draws on an in-depth knowledge of Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions of advanced age.

In its early stages, Alzheimer’s disease may closely resemble the natural forgetfulness of later life, though certain key differences are noticeable. Many older individuals report trouble forgetting appointments or the names of new acquaintances, but this manifests differently in a patient with early-stage Alzheimer’s. These patients forget new information often and frequently need to have the same information repeated multiple times.

Many older people forget the day of the week or the month, but they are able to recall this information after thinking on it for a moment. Patients with Alzheimer’s, by contrast, may lose track not only of dates but also of their sense of time. They may not be able to understand events that are not happening immediately, and they may forget the current season and even lose track of their surroundings.

Similarly, although it is normal for an older person to misplace an item occasionally, patients with Alzheimer’s may not be able to retrace their earlier steps and find where they may have laid down the item. They may accuse others of stealing the item, particularly if they are experiencing the personality changes or increased moodiness that often characterizes the disease. These social challenges, combined with a new inability to follow conversations, may make patients with Alzheimer’s disease more withdrawn, as well.

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