How to Stay Healthy This Fall

As summer transitions into fall in just two weeks time (the first day of autumn is September 22nd), Vancouver physician, Ali Ghahary, has put together a list of tips on how to better prepare yourself for the changing seasons.

How to Stay Healthy This Fall

As flu season approaches in November, it’s not a bad idea to get the flu shot a bit early. Typically, many clinics and pharmacies around Vancouver and surrounding areas will offer the flu shot as early as October. If you are high-risk (such as a senior over the age of 65, have a previously diagnosed chronic illness, have a weakened immune system or are pregnant), Dr. Ali Ghahary recommends getting the flu shot. It is also recommended for children under the age of 5. There are many types of flu strains, and it is a highly contagious illness, so it’s always a good idea to protect yourself against it. To avoid influenza, always practice good hygiene habits such as regular hand washing, keeping your mouth and nose covered when coughing, and avoiding contact with others who are sick.

Along with the fall also comes gloomier weather – this means more clouds and rain than sunshine. As a result, we’ll be spending more time indoors than out, which means our intake of Vitamin D will be decreased. To ensure you’re getting enough Vitamin D, Dr. Ali Ghahary recommends taking a Vitamin D supplement. Taking Vitamin D helps with calcium absorption, and it also boosts your immune system and your mood. Click here for more surprising benefits of Vitamin D.

Daylight savings also occurs in the fall. On November 5th, we’ll be turning our clocks behind an hour. This means that there will be longer periods of darkness, and as a result you will be getting some extra sleep. However, some people often have trouble with daylight savings as it can make you feel as though your sleep pattern has been significantly disrupted. Despite getting that extra hour of sleep, it’s still important to go to bed at a decent time and make sure you’re getting at least 8 hours of sleep each night so you feel well-rested the next day. For those who suffer from insomnia, Dr. Ali Ghahary shares some tips on how to fight it on his website at alighahary.ca.

You may also notice a change in your skin during the colder fall months, and even into winter. Cooler temperatures can cause skin to become pale, dry and flaky, so it is important to keep your skin moisturized. You can also still wear a sunscreen. If you have sensitive skin, your family physician or dermatologist will be able to recommend something to you.

Staying active is also important! With the change in weather you may be less inclined to exercise outdoors. However, there are still ways you can keep fit at home. If you don’t have exercise equipment, doing stretches and yoga are great ways to stay physically active. Many community centres also have drop-in sessions available and some even offer free fitness classes.

Also remember to keep eating healthy. In-season vegetables broccoli, squash, kale, cabbage, and other dark, leafy green vegetables such as spinach and romaine lettuce. You can find much more information on healthy eating by clicking here.

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Skipping Meals Can Lead to Health Problems

Vancouver physician, Dr. Ali Ghahary, has always been a strong advocate of healthy eating – promoting healthy diets and weight management to all of his patients at Brentwood Medical Clinic.

In previous blogs, Dr. Ali Ghahary has written about the importance of healthy eating…but what about skipping meals all together?

Eating three meals per day is important and has many advantages – not only does it help you spread calories throughout the day, but you are more likely to feel satisfied and not as hungry. If you’re the type of person who snacks all day, you may find it more difficult to keep track of calories and you’re also less likely to make healthy food choices. By spreading out your meals, you allow your body time to digest and utilize all of the nutrients that it needs, making you feel more energized. If you eat large amounts of food in one sitting, your body is more likely to increase the speed of digestion, which can lead to stomach aches, diarrhea, and even fatigue.

By now we’ve all heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. This is because the body fasts for up to 8 hours while sleeping. By eating breakfast, you help to get your brain functioning and body moving. When choosing your meals, it is important to pick foods from each of the different food groups: Fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy.

Skipping meals means you will be low on the nutrients your body requires, such as proteins, vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids. You are also at an increased risk of developing certain diseases such as heart disease and type II diabetes. Individuals who skip meals are also more likely to snack on junk food and skip exercise.

In order to maintain nutrients and healthy levels of cholesterol, insulin, and have normal blood pressure, our bodies need to be fed healthy and fed regularly.

You can visit Dr. Ali Ghahary’s blog on Blogspot for more information on diets and exercise.

Health Dangers of Sugar

Dr. Ali Ghahary, a family doctor from Vancouver, Canada, has always been a strong advocate of healthy eating.

Ali Ghahary - sugar cubesIn previous blogs, Dr. Ali Ghahary has written about the importance of having a healthy diet and how bad eating habits can negatively impact your health. Something that has been long known to contribute to a decline in health is sugar. Canadians consume an overwhelming amount of sugar each year – almost 90 pounds worth! On average, males and females between the ages of 9 and 13 consume about 103 to 120 pounds of sugar – a number that increases during teenage years, up to as much as 138 pounds. The primary source of sugar consumption in the younger generation is carbonated soft-drinks. However, it can also be found in other sources such as candy, and even fruits and vegetables. Sure, sugar can taste good, but it is having harmful, even life-threatening effects on our health.

Ali Ghahary - carbonated beverages
Soft-drinks are a common source of sugar

Perhaps one of the reasons why Canadians are consuming so much sugar today is because we don’t actually know how much we’re putting into our bodies. This is why in 2014, Health Canada proposed that changes be made to nutrition labels that would require companies to make it clear as to exactly how much sugar was going into packaged foods in the hope that it would deter individuals from eating unhealthy items and instead want to make healthier choices. The World Health Organization also came up with new guidelines that same year, stating that sugar should make up for less than 10 percent of our energy intake per day, which is a number that has already been far exceeded. They go on to add that if we cut that number in half to 5%, we would reap additional benefits.

Salad dressings also contain sugar, something that is usually unbeknownst to shoppers without reading nutritional labels.

Even for individuals who do strive to make healthy food choices, sugar can still be difficult to avoid. This is due in part to sugar being hidden in certain processed foods that aren’t necessarily thought of as “unhealthy” or even sweet. Ketchup, for example, contains as much as 4 grams of sugar in just one tablespoon. Salad dressing, tomato sauce, marinades, processed meats and pretzels also contain sugar. It is even found in infant formula.

One of the main reasons why sugar should be avoided is because it contains calories and does not have any essential nutrients. In fact, excessive intake of sugar can actually lead to nutrient deficiencies. Sugar is also high in fructose, which can cause a multitude of health problems. While it may not be an issue if we only consume a small amount (from a fruit, for example) or exercise regularly…if fructose overloads the liver, it is then turned into fat. Sugar can also cause insulin resistance, which causes problems with glucose (blood sugar.) Too much glucose can be toxic, and is one of the biggest reasons for complications from diabetes. Individuals who consume more beverages containing sugar, such as soda, are 85% more likely to develop Type II diabetes. According to multiple studies, sugar has also been thought to contribute to cancer – one of the leading causes of death worldwide – as it feeds cancer cells. In addition to all of these health problems, sugar also leads to cavities, feeds candida (yeast), can lead to osteoporosis, contributes to heart problems and ulcers, can cause arthritis, and promotes the aging of skin.

For more information on healthy eating, follow Dr. Ali Ghahary on Instagram and Twitter. If you are interested with speaking to Dr. Ghahary about your health directly, you can find his walk-in schedule on his website at http://alighaharyvancouver.ca.